What I read in June
The Other Language by Francesca Marciano: Craving a vicarious Italian escapade? Perfect collection of stories set in Italy.
The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith: I kept waiting for this mystery novel to pick up some steam but it never became the suspenseful sort of mystery that holds my attention. It seemed mostly like a set-up for the series, I’ll still give the second book in the series, The Silkworm, a try.
Where She Went by Gail Forman: Gail Forman has become one of my favorite YA authors, I love how her books come in pairs first from the girl’s perspective and then from the boy’s. If I Stay and Where She Went are super satisfying reads, just enough romance and drama :)

What I read in June

The Other Language by Francesca Marciano: Craving a vicarious Italian escapade? Perfect collection of stories set in Italy.

The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith: I kept waiting for this mystery novel to pick up some steam but it never became the suspenseful sort of mystery that holds my attention. It seemed mostly like a set-up for the series, I’ll still give the second book in the series, The Silkworm, a try.

Where She Went by Gail Forman: Gail Forman has become one of my favorite YA authors, I love how her books come in pairs first from the girl’s perspective and then from the boy’s. If I Stay and Where She Went are super satisfying reads, just enough romance and drama :)

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via dannygoodmanwriting

 " A novel is a daily labor over a period of years. A novel is a job. But a story can be like a mad, lovely visitor, with whom you spend a rather exciting weekend.

— Lorrie Moore, The Art of Fiction No. 167 (via theparisreview)

July 7     76 notes   
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June 30     1,276 notes   
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Quick

Someone set up Ruth Bader Ginsberg with some horcruxes. 

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Let’s go USA!

Let’s go USA!

June 22     56 notes   
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via booksandpublishing
wordpainting:

Bestselling writer Stephen King reading in the middle of a Red Sox baseball game. His team, the Red Sox, were losing, so he made the best of that time. The book he’s reading is Kate Atkinson’s book, When Will There Be Good News?

wordpainting:

Bestselling writer Stephen King reading in the middle of a Red Sox baseball game. His team, the Red Sox, were losing, so he made the best of that time. The book he’s reading is Kate Atkinson’s book, When Will There Be Good News?

June 7     1,085 notes   
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via sarabenincasa

 " 

The idea that one should be ashamed or embarrassed to read YA fiction because it is somehow a betrayal of one’s obligation to Real Literature? That’s intellectual posturing. That’s snobbish. That’s ill-informed.

That’s fucking bullshit.

— Adults Can Read Whatever The Hell They Want (via sarabenincasa)

June 5     296 notes   
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What I read in May:
The Sports Gene by David Epstein: An exhaustively researched look at how genetics and environment play into athletic greatness. Anyone interested in the biology behind athletic talent should pick this up. 
Last Train to Paris by Michele Zackheim: The main character is a female journalist in Paris pre-WWII. Could have been plotted more skillfully, there is a murder subplot that is wedged into the pre-war tensions and feels out of place. The author typically writes non-fiction and I definitely felt that throughout the book—dialogue, description, and plotting felt off.
The Bat by Jo Nesbo: Terrible timing to read a book about a serial killer targeting blonde women. Recent events aside, Nesbo’s main character uses his girlfriend as bait in the book which results in her murder and it was barely mourned or regretted at all. No thanks, no more Nesbo for me.
Going Bovine by Libba Bray: This was been on my list for a while. I enjoyed it, thought it examined mortality in an interesting, accessible fashion.
Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill: Loved, loved. The entire book is a pull quote waiting to happen. Only complaint is that it could have been longer.
Furious Love by Sam Kashner: Since seeing National Velvet as a kid, I have always loved Elizabeth Taylor. Furious Love provides a voyeuristic look at her life and relationship with Richard Burton, a truly epic love story.

What I read in May:

  • The Sports Gene by David Epstein: An exhaustively researched look at how genetics and environment play into athletic greatness. Anyone interested in the biology behind athletic talent should pick this up. 
  • Last Train to Paris by Michele Zackheim: The main character is a female journalist in Paris pre-WWII. Could have been plotted more skillfully, there is a murder subplot that is wedged into the pre-war tensions and feels out of place. The author typically writes non-fiction and I definitely felt that throughout the book—dialogue, description, and plotting felt off.
  • The Bat by Jo Nesbo: Terrible timing to read a book about a serial killer targeting blonde women. Recent events aside, Nesbo’s main character uses his girlfriend as bait in the book which results in her murder and it was barely mourned or regretted at all. No thanks, no more Nesbo for me.
  • Going Bovine by Libba Bray: This was been on my list for a while. I enjoyed it, thought it examined mortality in an interesting, accessible fashion.
  • Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill: Loved, loved. The entire book is a pull quote waiting to happen. Only complaint is that it could have been longer.
  • Furious Love by Sam Kashner: Since seeing National Velvet as a kid, I have always loved Elizabeth Taylor. Furious Love provides a voyeuristic look at her life and relationship with Richard Burton, a truly epic love story.
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via jamiatt
jamiatt:

Props to the graphic designer for cramming so much guilt into so few pixels.

jamiatt:

Props to the graphic designer for cramming so much guilt into so few pixels.

June 1     26 notes   
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May 29     23 notes   
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