Kate Spade is killing it with their notebook game. Bookshelf print and Dorothy Parker quotes? Two please!

October 7     20 notes   
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 " The pursuit of happiness has always seemed to me a somewhat heavy American burden, but in Manhattan it is conceived as a peculiar form of duty.

— A new Zadie Smith essay on a Monday, what a nice gift.

October 6     35 notes   
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What I read in September:
The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith: These detective books are a lot of fun to read. My only quibble is that they are way under-edited. J.K. Rowling applies the same level of Harry Potter world building detail in books about the modern world where it isn’t necessary. I wound up skipping a lot of description that bogged down the fast paced nature of a mystery novel.
Nobody is Ever Missing by Catherine Lacey: Unpopular opinion alert—I hated this book. I am sufficiently a prisoner of my own thoughts and mind that reading a novel of a woman trapped in her own head was painful. The story didn’t compel me to keep reading, the hope of it turning into something interesting did and ultimately it did not deliver for me.
The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery: Ah I loved this one. What a delight—Paris, a precocious child, an autodidact concierge letting herself be charmed and experience hope for the first time in ages. Such a great mixture of elements and beautiful writing to boot.
Green Girl by Kate Zambreno: Captures the transience of the early twenties a little too well! This was cringey to read because it was so true to experience.

What I read in September:

  • The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith: These detective books are a lot of fun to read. My only quibble is that they are way under-edited. J.K. Rowling applies the same level of Harry Potter world building detail in books about the modern world where it isn’t necessary. I wound up skipping a lot of description that bogged down the fast paced nature of a mystery novel.
  • Nobody is Ever Missing by Catherine Lacey: Unpopular opinion alert—I hated this book. I am sufficiently a prisoner of my own thoughts and mind that reading a novel of a woman trapped in her own head was painful. The story didn’t compel me to keep reading, the hope of it turning into something interesting did and ultimately it did not deliver for me.
  • The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery: Ah I loved this one. What a delight—Paris, a precocious child, an autodidact concierge letting herself be charmed and experience hope for the first time in ages. Such a great mixture of elements and beautiful writing to boot.
  • Green Girl by Kate Zambreno: Captures the transience of the early twenties a little too well! This was cringey to read because it was so true to experience.
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Pretty much

Pretty much

September 29     578 notes   
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via books

me: *owns 264 unread books*
me: *buys 17 new books*
me: *rereads harry potter*

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Must own this.

Must own this.

September 14     57 notes   
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Rainy day: crushing it.

Rainy day: crushing it.

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via harperperennial
harperperennial:

Aww, tumblr is celebrating International Literacy Day with their logo!
Google is not.

harperperennial:

Aww, tumblr is celebrating International Literacy Day with their logo!

Google is not.

September 8     38 notes   
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What I read in August:
Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng: Pretty masterful story telling, I love books where you are presented with the ending/outcome in the first pages and the hows and whys are pieced together throughout.
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins: Fun boarding school love story set in Paris. Taste the baguettes and macarons.
Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh: A great extension of her popular blog. Anyone who can make depression accessible, relatable and less lonely is a hero in my book.
Autobiography of Red by Anne Carson: Anne Carson is a queen. Plainwater remains my favorite but this was v, v good.

What I read in August:

  • Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng: Pretty masterful story telling, I love books where you are presented with the ending/outcome in the first pages and the hows and whys are pieced together throughout.
  • Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins: Fun boarding school love story set in Paris. Taste the baguettes and macarons.
  • Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh: A great extension of her popular blog. Anyone who can make depression accessible, relatable and less lonely is a hero in my book.
  • Autobiography of Red by Anne Carson: Anne Carson is a queen. Plainwater remains my favorite but this was v, v good.
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via powells
August 26     59 notes   
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